Graduate Research

Friday essay: when did Australia’s human history begin?

In July, a new date was published that pushed the opening chapters of Australian history back to 65,000 years ago. It is the latest development in a time revolution that has gripped the nation over the past half century. This article seeks to move beyond the view of ancient Australia as a timeless and traditional foundation story to explore the ways in which scientists and humanists are engaging with the deep past as a transformative human history.

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Exploring ethical futures through the dark lens of dystopia

More than simply a thought-provoking genre of literature, the dark creations of writers of dystopian fiction give us the opportunity to reflect on the present and the future. PhD candidates Zachary Kendal of Monash University and Jung Ju Shin of the University of Warwick are leading teams of Monash and Warwick postgraduate students to explore ethics, utopia, dystopia and science fiction with a new multidisciplinary conference 15-17 December in Melbourne. Keynote speakers include Emeritus Professor Andrew Milner (Monash University and University of Warwick) …

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The role of language: interview with Professor Rita Wilson

As part of our Arts Researchers podcast series, we spoke with Professor Rita Wilson on a number of her research projects and how they help inform better policies, settlement services, international governance and social cohesion. We also covered the global research networks, industry partnerships and opportunities for research students in this area at Monash – the only university in Australia that offers a practice-based PhD in Interpreting and Translation.

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Language and table top games: recent PhD completion

Catherine Cook has been awarded a doctorate for her fascinating thesis about Person Reference Across the Multiple Worlds of Table-Top Roleplaying Games. That is the second part of the title of the thesis; the first part is much more fun and gives an idea of the problems Cat deals with in this thesis: I Rolled…

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Collective responsibility for antibiotic resistance: interview with Associate Professor Mark Davis

Bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics. The WHO recently stated that this increasing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will lead to the death of millions in years to come unless all countries are supported to be better prepared. A global multi-sector response to this threat includes efforts to communicate with individuals and communities so that they understand the AMR crisis and enact the expert advice provided to them. Towards this end, Associate Professor Mark Davis is leading an international team on a new ARC Discovery Project researching publics, media and communications on antibiotic resistance.

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Major new scholarship fund to be available to Arts postgraduate students

Monash University has received one of its largest ever gifts from the estate of highly respected lawyer and Monash alumna Francine V McNiff, who donated $3.72 million to the University.The Francine V McNiff Scholarship Fund ($1.72 million) will be available to candidates from both the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Law, and will provide financial support for the duration of the recipient’s post-graduate study.

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Australian border control with Associate Professor Marie Segrave

If border control in Australia perpetuates death and unlawful migrant exploitation in Australia, who is accountable and what must change? In 2010, the Border Crossing Observatory was founded by Professor Sharon Pickering and Associate Professor Leanne Weber, with Associate Professor Marie Segrave. It is an innovative virtual research centre that connects Australian and international stakeholders to…

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Monash Bioethics Centre plays key role in development of first international guidelines for public health surveillance ethics

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has just released the first comprehensive international guidelines for public health surveillance ethics.*    Development of these guidelines was a project of the Global Network of WHO Collaborating Centres for Bioethics, which is currently chaired by Monash University Professor Michael Selgelid who is also Director of the Monash Bioethics Centre.   The goal of the guideline development…

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First Australians lived through the Ice Age: what must we learn for our future?

For over 60,000 years Aboriginal Australians lived and thrived in the Australian landscape. They had sophisticated and complex social systems with languages and religions that were unrecognisable to 19th century Europeans. Today, more of the ingenuity and wisdom in Aboriginal Australian’s practices and knowledge systems is being uncovered – revealing significant potential solutions for our imminent…

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