Opinion and Commentary

Friday essay: when did Australia’s human history begin?

In July, a new date was published that pushed the opening chapters of Australian history back to 65,000 years ago. It is the latest development in a time revolution that has gripped the nation over the past half century. This article seeks to move beyond the view of ancient Australia as a timeless and traditional foundation story to explore the ways in which scientists and humanists are engaging with the deep past as a transformative human history.

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Yes! The results of the same-sex marriage survey are in, so what happens now?

We now have the answer to the $122 million question: should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry? The 12.7 million voters who participated in the postal survey had the reasonable expectation that a long and divisive debate would at last be resolved. But a final question remains: what will Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull do now? Monash political scientist Dr Zareh Ghazarian …

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Closer media ties a boon for Chinese students

By Xinhui Wang Monash’s large number of Chinese media students had a taste of home with a visit from a major Chinese media company last week. The Anhui Broadcasting Corporation, a provincial public broadcasting controlled by the Anhui government in eastern China, visited MFJ and the Monash Media Lab last week, bringing Traffic Broadcasting Frequency Director Zhou…

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Video of The Horrible Mess of Climate Change Politics: public lecture by Clive Hamilton

Over 100 people braved the rain for the booked out Monash Arts Public Lecture, ‘The Horrible Mess of Climate Change Politics‘, hosted by our School of Social Sciences‘ Department of Human Geography held at the State Library of Victoria. Professor Clive Hamilton delivered the keynote address and he was joined by Dr William Jackson, Chief Author of…

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Was embracing the market a necessary evil for Labour and Labor?

Wayne Swan has drawn a parallel between the the ALP’s ‘Laborism’ and New Labour’s ‘Third Way’ in the UK. Number 10/flickr, CC BY-NC by Keshia Jacotine, Monash University This article is part of the Democracy Futures series, a joint global initiative between The Conversation and the Sydney Democracy Network. The project aims to stimulate fresh…

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Not jobs and growth but post-capitalism – and creative industries show the way

The term “creative industries” was first applied to the cultural sector by UK New Labour in 1998, and rapidly gained global traction. It was a kind of Faustian bargain for the cultural sector, which gave up its traditional suspicion of commercial imperatives in return for a seat at the grown-ups’ table where the governmental big…

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What next for Mosul?

By Yasmin Chilmeran After three years, Iraqi government forces have liberated Mosul from ISIS control. As the community begins to heal, it is Iraq’s female parliamentarians who are leading the efforts to rebuild. Following Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi’s declaration of victory over ISIS (Daesh) on 9 July, the important question is what comes next. The…

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Strange bedfellows? The ideological migration of UKIP voters to Labour in the 2017 UK General Election

by David Jeffery and Keshia Jacotine At 10pm on Thursday 8 June, British voters faced yet another political shock. Despite an overwhelming 21 percent lead (YouGov), the Conservatives failed to win enough seats to form a majority government. As the count unfolded, the reality dawned that Theresa May did not receive the landslide that she had gambled…

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