Opinion and Commentary

Not jobs and growth but post-capitalism – and creative industries show the way

The term “creative industries” was first applied to the cultural sector by UK New Labour in 1998, and rapidly gained global traction. It was a kind of Faustian bargain for the cultural sector, which gave up its traditional suspicion of commercial imperatives in return for a seat at the grown-ups’ table where the governmental big…

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What next for Mosul?

By Yasmin Chilmeran After three years, Iraqi government forces have liberated Mosul from ISIS control. As the community begins to heal, it is Iraq’s female parliamentarians who are leading the efforts to rebuild. Following Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi’s declaration of victory over ISIS (Daesh) on 9 July, the important question is what comes next. The…

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Strange bedfellows? The ideological migration of UKIP voters to Labour in the 2017 UK General Election

by David Jeffery and Keshia Jacotine At 10pm on Thursday 8 June, British voters faced yet another political shock. Despite an overwhelming 21 percent lead (YouGov), the Conservatives failed to win enough seats to form a majority government. As the count unfolded, the reality dawned that Theresa May did not receive the landslide that she had gambled…

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Playing politics with renewables: how the right is losing its way

Rocking the boat: Scott Morrison and his infamous lump of carbon. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas by David Holmes This summer has seen a concerted attack on renewable energy coming out of Canberra, featuring everyone from One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts to Coalition ministers channelling the far right of their party. So absurd and illogical has the broadside…

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PewDiePie, new media stars and the court of public opinion

Steven Roberts, Monash University and Marcus Maloney, Monash University PewDiePie is the username of the world’s most famous YouTube video blogger, 27-year-old Swede, Felix Kjellberg. PewDiePie’s vlogs, centred on his comedic video game commentaries, attract more than 53 million (mostly young) subscribers – more than any other YouTube channel. He was ranked by Forbes in…

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How far they’ll go: Moana shows the power of Polynesian celestial navigation

Duane W. Hamacher, Monash University and Carla Bento Guedes, UNSW This article contains minor spoilers. One of the greatest feats of human migration in history was the colonisation of the vast Pacific Ocean by Polynesian peoples. They achieved it thanks to their sophisticated knowledge of positional astronomy and celestial navigation. The Disney film Moana has…

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WA state election: Liberals’ deal with One Nation may come back to bite them

Narelle Miragliotta, Monash University Elections are colourful affairs, and the March 11 state election in Western Australia is no exception. What is bringing particular clamour to this election is the resurgence of One Nation. Pauline Hanson’s party has certainly made its presence felt. The party is contesting 35 of the state’s 59 Legislative Assembly seats,…

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Bernardi should have resigned his Senate seat: here’s why

Narelle Miragliotta, Monash University Senator Cory Bernardi’s decision to quit the Liberal Party comes as no surprise to most political observers. For quite some time, and certainly since Malcolm Turnbull’s elevation to the Liberal leadership, Bernardi’s resignation from the party was always a distinct possibility. However, his decision to quit the party without resigning from…

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