Monash pays tribute to visionary journalist and academic Philip Chubb

Monash pays tribute to visionary journalist and academic Philip Chubb
Associate Professor Philip Chubb.

Monash University's deputy head of Media, Film and Journalism Associate Professor Philip Chubb died peacefully overnight after a battle with cancer.

Monash's Dean of Arts Professor Sharon Pickering said Phil, who was also head of journalism, worked at the university after a long and distinguished career as a journalist and won numerous awards, including a Gold Walkley, a Gold UN media peace prize and a Logie.

“Phil joined Monash in 2008 and was a driving force behind the journalism program,” Professor Pickering said.

“I feel great sympathy for Phil's family and his dear colleagues in the School of Media Film and Journalism.

“Phil was a greatly cherished colleague and friend and the faculty is much better for his professionalism, commitment and care. He will be sadly missed.”

Head of Media Film and Journalism Associate Professor Mia Lindgren said Phil was a distinguished journalist and academic who was widely loved and respected.

“We mourn our colleague and friend Associate Professor Phil Chubb. Phil came to academia 10 years ago after a long and distinguished career as journalist, with numerous awards to his name,” Associate Professor Lindgren said.

“As head of journalism at Monash University, he transformed journalism into the successful program it is today. His doctoral thesis, examining climate politics under the Rudd and Gillard government, was published in 2014 as his third book, Power Failure.

“Phil was a much loved and highly respected colleague and friend at Monash University. His work as deputy head of the School of Media, Film and Journalism was informed by his strong sense of ethics, social justice, professionalism and commitment.

“He was a wonderful person whose kindness and care of others, his colleagues and students, will always be remembered. We miss him terribly.”

Acting head of journalism Associate Professor Fay Anderson said it was a great privilege to work with Phil.

“He was a much-loved friend and colleague whose decency, generosity and humour have always shone. Phil was awarded a Gold Walkley for the groundbreaking 1993 series Labor in Power and won a Gold UN media peace prize and a Logie for best TV documentary,” Associate Professor Anderson said.

“Phil was also the author of three books including his most recent, Power Failure. A true visionary, Phil has transformed the journalism program at Monash University. He has left an enduring and inspiring legacy. We will miss him greatly.”

Monash University adjunct senior lecturer Dr Bill Birnbauer shared Phil's journey as an award-winning journalist and academic for several decades.

“Phil was my boss at The Age when we reported state parliament in the late 1970s and early 1980s and was my boss again when we both started at Monash University on the same day on December 1, 2008,” Dr Birnbauer said.

“Phil was selfless, inclusive, loyal and fun to be with. Like many others who worked under his leadership, I felt privileged and wanted to work for him, but it always felt like I was working with a mate as an equal partner.”