One cannot know what one cannot imagine: The legacy of Claude Lanzmann and Shoah (1985)

Public Lecture

Panel: 
Dr. Noah Shenker
Dr. Daniel Kupfert Heller
Professor Susannah Radstone

Wednesday 5th September, 2018
7:30 PM

 

Monash Caulfield Campus
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
900 Dandenong Rd, Caulfield East

 

With his recent passing, Claude Lanzmann, described as the ‘epic chronicler of the Holocaust’, has bequeathed to us a body of work that continues to inspire intense response, thought and debate. In this public event, our three presenters will each discuss the questions provoked by Lanzmann’s monumental oeuvre, particularly his canonical film Shoah (1985). 

 

Dr. Noah Shenker is N. Milgrom & 6a Foundation Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Monash University.

His recent publications include the book Reframing Holocaust Testimony (Indiana University Press, 2015), and an article “Through the Lens of the Shoah: The Holocaust as a Paradigm for Documenting Genocide Testimonies,” in the journal History & Memory (2016). 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Daniel Kupfert Heller is Kronhill Senior Lecturer in East European Jewish History at Monash University. He is the author of Jabotinsky’s Children: Polish Jews and the Rise of Right-Wing Zionism (Princeton University Press, 2017).

Before his recent arrival in Melbourne, he was an assistant professor in Montreal, where he received McGill University’s top teaching prizes.

 

 

 

 

Professor Susannah Radstone is currently Professor of Cultural Theory in the Division of Education, Arts and Social Sciences at the University of South Australia and Adjunct Professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical and International Studies, Monash University. She has published extensively on psychoanalytic and feminist cultural theory, cinema studies and cultural memory studies. Books include The Sexual Politics of Time (2007); (ed. with Bill Schwarz), Culture and the Unconscious, (2007); (ed. with Katherine Hodgkin) Memory, History, NationThe Politics of Memory (2005); (ed. with Katharine Hodgkin). She is currently completing a new monograph titled Getting Over Trauma.

 

 

Free admission
No bookings required