Posts Tagged ‘criminology’

BA Alum Laurenza Buglisi’s outstanding career as a prominent advocate for victims and survivors of sexual assault

Since graduating from Monash with a double major in Psychology and Criminology in a Bachelor of Arts, Laurenza has had an outstanding career as a prominent advocate for victims and survivors of sexual assault, both in Australia and internationally. At Monash’s regular seminar for students ‘Arts in the Real World’, she shared her experiences of working in the community and mental health sector. In this interview, Laurenza talks about inspiring moments at Monash, the benefits of studying and working abroad, and strategies for students to improve their employability.

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Monash academics win two NSW Premier’s History Awards

Monash University scooped up two awards at the NSW Premier’s History Awards night on Friday 1 September. Two academics from our School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics were winners in different categories for their internationally significant work in history. Associate Professor Beatrice Trefalt and team won the General history prize for the book Japanese war…

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Australian border control with Associate Professor Marie Segrave

If border control in Australia perpetuates death and unlawful migrant exploitation in Australia, who is accountable and what must change? In 2010, the Border Crossing Observatory was founded by Professor Sharon Pickering and Associate Professor Leanne Weber, with Associate Professor Marie Segrave. It is an innovative virtual research centre that connects Australian and international stakeholders to…

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More police won’t necessarily lead to better outcomes on family violence – here’s what we need

Marie Segrave, Monash University; Dean Wilson, University of Sussex, and Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University The Victorian government is recruiting more frontline police as part of a broader drive to tackle crime in the state. Among the new recruits will be 415 officers specially trained to deal with family violence. The efforts to change attitudes and…

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Dr Kate Fitz-Gibbon awarded CHASS Future Leaders award

Monash Criminology’s Dr Kate Fitz-Gibbon has been awarded the Council of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS) 2016 Future Leaders award. The Future Leader Award is given to an individual under 25 years of age who is demonstrating leadership skill and potential in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Dr Fitz-Gibbon was jointly awarded with Sarah Holland-Batt. Dr…

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UK experience of domestic violence disclosure schemes is a cautionary tale for Australia

Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University and Sandra Walklate, University of Liverpool The 2009 murder of Clare Wood by her ex-partner led to the introduction of a national domestic violence disclosure scheme (known as “Clare’s Law”) in England and Wales. The scheme aims to prevent the perpetration and escalation of violence between intimate partners through the sharing…

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Criminology Professor Jude McCulloch appointed to Victoria’s Prevention of Family Violence Standing Committee

Professor Jude McCulloch has been appointed to Victoria’s Prevention of Family Violence Standing Committee, chaired by Fiona Richardson, the Minister for Women and Minister for Prevention of Family Violence.  The purpose of the committee is to be the overarching forum for advice to the Family Violence Steering Committee on primary prevention principles, directions and outcomes.…

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Professor Sharon Pickering presents Fay Gale Lecture

Professor Sharon Pickering, was honoured on Tuesday night to present the annual Fay Gale Lecture, hosted by the Academy of Social Sciences Australia (ASSA) in conjunction with Monash University at the State Library of Victoria. Introduced by ASSA Fellow Professor Kathleen Dalyfrom Griffith University, Sharon presented her lecture on gender and border deaths in the South…

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I would build… radical strategies for resisting the harms of reform

Dr Bree Carlton, from Criminology in the School of Social Sciences, asks whether penal reform is as obsolete as the prison. Abolitionism is a theory and method for dismantling prisons and criminal justice. It is above all concerned with strategising alternatives to imprisonment and, ultimately, in the long term, the eventual eradication of prisons. Radical…

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