Welcome Goshu Tefera: Researching the temporalities of refugee integration in Australia

Welcome Goshu Tefera: Researching the temporalities of refugee integration in Australia

We welcome PhD student Goshu Tefera to the PMSI Postgraduate Network. From the discipline of Human Geography and under the supervision of Associate Professor Alan Gamlen, Goshu is researching ‘The temporalities of refugee integration in Australia’ focusing on the experiences of Ethiopian-Australians from a refugee background in regards to integration, time and associated temporalities. 

Goshu Tefera

He theorises integration in relation to refugees’ lived experiences, existing conditions, and expectations in the Australian society by examining how pre-arrival, present, and future temporalities affect integration. Refugees’ pre – and post – migration experiences are temporal, characterised by a long period of waiting, monotonous routine, uncertainty, dilemma, instability, and vulnerability. Using a qualitative approach and focusing on Ethiopian-Australians living in Melbourne, the research seeks to understand these temporalities in relation to refugee integration in Australia. First, drawing on time literature and contemporary migration studies notions of temporality, the project engages in the broader theoretical and philosophical conceptualization of time as it relates to individual experiences in refugee integration. Second, it analyses the meanings and implications of waiting before and after the migration phenomena. Third, it unpacks how differences in temporal logics (individual, country of origin and country of resettlement) shape refugee integration dynamics and how refugees negotiate their individual lived time with ramifications that arise as a result of these variations. Finally, the project reasons out the implications of these temporal experiences for a policy agenda and refugee-related interventions.

Prior to joining Monash, Goshu explored the transnational social and political engagement of the Ethiopian diaspora in Washington DC, as part of his Master’s degree in African Studies at Syracuse University, United States.